Shock as Doctors Blame 6-Year-Old Hockey Player’s Myocarditis on Flu Before She Suffers ‘Massive Stroke’ and Dies

A 6-year-old Canadian girl who died last month entered the hospital diagnosed with myocarditis linked to the flu but later passed away after a stroke.

Danielle Mei Cabana was admitted to BC Children’s Hospital after she appeared to have flu symptoms long after other siblings had recovered, according to Richmond News.

The girl’s flu symptoms began to appear around Nov. 11, the site said, citing comments on the Instagram account of her father, Denis Cabana. The account is private.

After arriving at the hospital, she was placed in intensive care, where she was diagnosed with myocarditis caused by the flu.

Myocarditis is an inflammation of the heart muscle in the organ’s middle layer.

The girl underwent two heart procedures and was breathing on her own, but then suffered a massive stroke.

“We went back to the room where the doctors unplugged the machine and we said our goodbyes,” Denis Cabana posted, according to the Western Standard.

“Dani held on for another 10 minutes or so before finally resting,” he wrote.

“While we may not be able to see or touch her again, her spirit and memories will live forever within her parents and sisters,” her father wrote, Richmond News reported.

Danielle played hockey for the Richmond Ravens, according to Canada Today.

Richmond Jets Minor Hockey Association teams wrapped their sticks in green camouflage tape as a tribute to the girl’s camping and hunting trips with her father.

Six children diagnosed with the flu have died over the past two weeks in British Columbia, according to CTV.

The Western Standard noted that in 2018-2019’s flu season, 10 children died of the flu in all of Canada.

Without citing specific sources, the Western Standard said health officials in the province believe that it is possible the increase in flu deaths is linked to “children having not been exposed to influenza and other respiratory illnesses as a result of previously implemented COVID-19 measures, such as when children were mandated to wear masks, socially distance, attend school virtually, and were prohibited from various other social activities.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.