Seemingly Healthy Decorated 101st Airborne Officer Dies of ‘Natural Causes’ on Deployment

While deployed in Romania, Lt. Col. Nicholas D. Goshen of the 101st Airborne Division died on Sept. 6 from “natural causes,” the Army said in a news release Monday, according to Army Times.

Goshen, 40, was serving with the division’s intelligence directorate while deployed at Mihail Kogalniceanu Air Base near the Black Sea port of Constanta.

The Army news release provided no other details about his death, American Military News reported.

“Nick was a valued member of the team whose passion and commitment to the division and our soldiers was extraordinary,” Maj. Gen. J.P. McGee, Goshen’s division commander, said in a statement, according to Stars and Stripes.

“I can personally attest to his exceptional talent. He will be missed,” McGee said.

After graduating from the Citadel in South Carolina, Goshen began his career as an infantry officer in 2004, Stars and Stripes reported.

The Ranger School graduate was stationed at Fort Campbell in Kentucky, according to American Military News.

As an infantry officer, Goshen deployed once to Iraq as a platoon leader and six times to Afghanistan during tours with the 173rd Airborne Brigade, 75th Ranger Regiment and 10th Mountain Division, Army Times reported.

Overall, Goshen served on combat missions overseas for 42 months, according to Stars and Stripes.

He earned numerous awards, including the Bronze Star for valor and the Purple Heart.

More recently, Goshen had completed a tour with the Joint Staff at the Pentagon before deploying to Eastern Europe, Army Times reported.

The 101st Airborne Division was dispatched to the region in June in response to the Ukraine-Russia war. While U.S. troops are not engaged in the conflict, they were sent to Eastern Europe on a mission “to reassure allies and deter potential aggression,” Stars and Stripes reported.

Overall, more than 4,000 troops from the 101st Airborne have been sent to the region, according to Army Times.

For Goshen, this deployment to Romania ended up being his final tour in the service of his country.

He leaves behind his wife of 14 years, Megan Epner.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.