Report: King Charles III Learned About Dying Queen in Frantic Phone Call, Then ‘Everything Was Silent’

A new report shines a light on King Charles’ reaction to learning of Queen Elizabeth’s imminent death.

Then-Prince Charles was at the Dumfries House estate in Scotland when he learned that his mother was ailing on Sept. 8, according to the Mirror, which cited Newsweek’s chief royal correspondent Jack Royston.

At the time, Charles’ wife Camilla was preparing for an interview with journalist Jenna Bush Hager, the daughter of former U.S. President George W. Bush.

An aide notified Charles of Elizabeth’s deteriorating health, quickly changing plans for the interview.

“Charles took a call, everything was silent, and they were asked to be silent,” Royston said.

The heir apparent immediately departed to be with the queen at Balmoral Castle.

Charles learned of his mother’s health situation very shortly before the public was told, according to the report.

Hager said aides were “running up and down the halls” hours before her scheduled interview with Camilla, Fox News reported.

“The next thing [Hager] knew, Charles and Camilla were in a helicopter. And that was at 12:30, so that was around exactly the same time that we were told,” Royston said.

Hager has recounted having a “lovely dinner” with Charles the night before the queen’s death, according to Fox.

She suspects that Elizabeth’s passing came as a surprise to her eldest son.

“I think it was a surprise. We had a wonderful evening filled with conversation that felt joyful. … So I think this was sort of a surprise,” Hager said on her NBC show.

The queen had experienced health challenges in recent years, but she held a meeting with Britain’s new Prime Minister Liz Truss just two days before her death.

Charles described his mother’s death as “the moment I’ve been dreading” in a meeting with Truss the day after Elizabeth’s passing.

Charles spent more time as heir to the British throne than anyone in history, a testament to his mother’s unmatched tenure as monarch.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.