Police Forced to Rescue Fish and Chip Shop Owner Who Spared Mob Fury with Celebration of Queen's Death

The late Queen Elizabeth II has been mourned by millions after her death this week, with Britons pointing to the Queen as a beloved national symbol.

One owner of a fish and chip shop in Scotland doesn’t quite see it the same way.

A mob arrived outside Jaki Fish and Chip Shop in Muir of Ord, Scotland, after the owner of the business released a video celebrating Elizabeth’s death on Thursday, according to the Daily Mail.

Jacki Pickett appeared in a Facebook video after the monarch’s death holding a placard that read “Lizard Liz Dead and London Bridge has fallen,” according to Newsweek.

Pickett popped a bottle of champagne in the video.

WARNING: The following video contains vulgar language that some viewers may find offensive.

Police were called as a furious mob gathered outside of the business on Thursday, according to the Daily Mail.

The crowd pelted the business with eggs in response to the owner’s disdain for the Queen. Seven police officers arrived in response to the tenuous situation, according to the Daily Mail.

Pickett ultimately left her business with a police escort.

The U.K.’s National Federation of Fish Friers revoked the membership of Pickett’s business after the controversy, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

It’s possible her signage was alluding to an internet conspiracy theory accusing the Queen and other world leaders of actually being reptilian beings from a distant solar system.

The Facebook page for the fish and chip shop has been disabled in the wake of the controversy. However, it made reference to a slogan associated with the QAnon movement in one post referencing the Queen’s death.

However, not everyone who opposes the British monarchy is an internet nut.

Republican sentiment isn’t unprecedented in British history. And no, not the American political party.

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English parliamentarian Oliver Cromwell executed King Charles I near the end of the English Civil War in the 17th century.

Britain was governed as a parliamentary republic until King Charles II regained control as the next monarch in 1660.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.