New Electric Mustang Only Lasted 6 Months Without Dangerous Complications – Ford Announces Major EV Recall

Ford’s electric version of its legendary Mustang muscle car has been hit with a recall.

Ford is recalling 1,175 of its 2022 Mustang Mach-E electric vehicles due to concerns that the right-rear axle half shafts may have a manufacturing defect, according to Ford Authority.

The defect means that the part could break.

The website YourMechanic noted the danger of a broken axle.

“When your axle fails, it’s possible that you’ll lose control of the car, possibly causing an accident,” the site advised.

“If you suspect that your axles are about to break, time is of the essence. Once broken completely, your car won’t move, and if they break while you’re driving, it could cause a serious accident.”

As part of the recall, dealers will inspect the Mach-E and replace right-rear half shafts as necessary.

There have been no reports from owners of problems with the vehicle, Ford Authority reported.

The recall covers Mach-E models produced between July 18 and July 29 at the Cuautitlan assembly plant in Mexico.

The base price of a Mustang Mach-E when the 2022 model was unveiled was $43,995, Car and Driver reported last year. The first deliveries of the 2022 Mach-E were in February.

The Mach-E has been hit with recalls before, according to cars.com.

In June, Ford recalled some 2021-2022 vehicles because the high-voltage battery main contactors may overheat.

In May, a recall was issued for the all-wheel drive version of the car. The Mach-E’s powertrain control module safety software was found unable to detect some software errors that could have led to unintended acceleration or deceleration.

A 2021 recall was issued because the car’s windshields could detach. Another 2021 recall was issued because the front subframe bolts may not have been tightened properly during assembly.

Among the recalls issued for electric vehicles was a recent one for Toyota’s bZ4X electric SUV.

In June, Toyota warned owners not to drive the car for fear the wheels could fall off. Toyota said at the time the cause was a mystery, but it would look into the glitch.

The company has not yet found the problem and last month offered to buy back the SUV from any owner who wants to be rid of a vehicle that cannot be driven.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.