Multiple Gruesome Scenes Wash Ashore at Mexican Resort Full of Tourists

Over the weekend in Acapulco, Mexico, three bodies with signs of violence on them washed up on the beaches.

The first two bodies were found on a popular beach on Saturday. A third body was then discovered on Sunday at another beach close by, The Sun reported.

One body had been tied to a cement anchor, while another looked to have gunshots in the back of his neck.

The Sun reported that all the bodies had signs of torture on them, but officials and the military did not close the beach while removing the bodies.

Though Acapulco is a beach resort town on the southwestern coast of the country, it has not been able to avoid the overall violence, crime, and cartel activity that has plagued all of Mexico.

Acapulco was rated the second most dangerous city in the world this year, according to Statista.

In 2022, the city had a murder rate of 110.5 per 100,000 inhabitants.

In 2018, the Acapulco police were disarmed by the Mexican military as it was thought that the city’s law enforcement had likely been corrupted by the drug cartels, The Sun reported.

For years, Acapulco has been a very dangerous city with multiple drug cartels trying to assert control over the territory, Yahoo News reported in 2016.

It has often been called “Guerrero’s Iraq” (Guerreros is the state in which Acapulco lies) due to the fighting and violence that engulfs it, Yahoo added.

But it’s not just Acapulco that is suffering from violence. The whole country is plagued by it.

The fall of 2022 has been particularly deadly for all of Mexico, let alone Acapulco.

In October alone there were about 2,500 homicides, Mexico News Daily reported.

Overall, Mexico looks to be having yet another deadly year and could hit more than 30,000 homicides by the end of the year. That would make 2022 the fifth year in a row that the country had more than 30,000 homicides, Mexico News Daily added.

Meanwhile, the U.S. has been warning citizens to not travel to places in Mexico like Acapulco, despite their famous resort attractions and beaches.

“Violent crime — such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery — is widespread and common in Mexico. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted,” the State Department warned in a travel advisory.

“U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Guerrero, including to tourist areas in Acapulco, Zihuatanejo, and Ixtapa,” the travel advisory added.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.