McDonald's Worker Shot Over Fries Dies, But Not Before Alleged Gunman Gives a Heartless Statement

A Brooklyn McDonald’s worker who was shot in the neck during an argument over cold french fries has died.

Matthew Webb, 23, succumbed to his injuries, the NYPD said, according to the New York Post.

The attack against Webb has been categorized as a homicide and there is an ongoing investigation into the events.

The shooting took place Monday, after 20-year-old Michael Morgan heard his mother complain about cold fries during a FaceTime call, the New York Daily News reported.

Morgan then went to the McDonald’s, where video surveillance showed that a man identified as Morgan punched Webb in the face and knocked him to the ground.

He then pulled his weapon and allegedly shot Webb in the neck.

Before Webb’s death was confirmed, Morgan was charged with attempted murder as well as criminal possession of a loaded firearm.

“The people are anticipating homicide charges in this case, given the victim is currently on life support,” Assistant District Attorney Luis Paternina said at Morgan’s arraignment on Thursday, the Daily News reported. “So, essentially, the victim’s family is waiting to make a difficult decision about taking the victim off life support.”

Those charges were expected to be upgraded even before Webb’s death, the Post reported.

However, in response to the whole incident, Morgan’s mom later told the police that her son simply told her that “he gotta do what he gotta do.”

Morgan’s girlfriend, Camellia Dunlap, has also been connected to the incident.

She was charged with weapons possession for allegedly handing the gun to Morgan, the Post reported.

The charges connected with Webb’s death are not the only ones that Morgan is facing.

During questioning about the McDonald’s shooting, he also allegedly confessed to an earlier murder from 2020, the Daily News reported.

This kind of senseless crime should be shocking to anyone, but especially to anyone living in cities throughout the U.S.

It’s no secret that crime rates have seen major spikes since the beginning of the pandemic, especially in major cities.

New York City, for instance, is seeing crime trends similar to those in 2009, when the country was in the midst of a recession, Bloomberg reported.

The whole country is trying to claw its way back from the economic and social fallout from COVID, and fighting rising crime rates is essential to healing both.

Crime and the economy go hand in hand, feeding off of each other. So to take steps forward in the economy means there also have to be simultaneous steps taken in fighting crime.

If that doesn’t happen, then more senseless and violent crimes, like murdering over cold fries, will keep happening and the overall economy will keep deteriorating.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.