Los Angeles Eliminates 1 Vitally Important Requirement for Government Employment

Los Angeles County is waiving its requirement of U.S. citizenship for most county jobs, allowing illegal immigrants to access public sector employment.

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to waive its existing citizenship requirement last week, according to KNBC-TV.

County Supervisor Hilda Solis celebrated the vote in a statement.

“Los Angeles County is a community of immigrants from each corner of the world,” Solis said. “And while our County-government workforce reflects the community it represents, there is room for improvement.

“This motion seeks to make clear that the County, as one of the largest employers in the region, strives to be an inclusive and diverse workforce, and is committed to not excluding nor allowing citizenship to be a barrier to employment.”

A June motion sponsored by Solis didn’t distinguish between non-citizen legal residents and illegal aliens.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department has an exception to the new policy. Existing California law requires law enforcement officers to at least be eligible and have applied for U.S. citizenship.

A 2019 profile from the pro-amnesty Migration Policy Institute estimated that nearly 1 million illegal aliens live in Los Angeles County.

Some major cities have moved to grant illegal aliens the right to participate in municipal elections.

The New York Supreme Court recently shot down an attempt on the part of New York City to grant illegals the right to participate in city elections.

California has long been a draw for illegal aliens seeking to evade pro-citizenship state laws.

Illegals are eligible for driver’s licenses in the state.

As Los Angeles County moves to bestow illegal aliens with new privileges, the area has suffered an exodus of residents.

Los Angeles County lost a whopping 179,757 residents in 2021, likely spurred by the metro area’s unaffordability, homelessness crisis and strict coronavirus policies.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.