Liar-in-Chief: 21 Ridiculous Made-Up Stories Biden Has Told as President

It should not be surprising that Joe Biden — the man who launched his presidential campaign based on a big lie about Donald Trump — has told several tall tales since becoming president.

You may recall in Biden’s video announcing his candidacy in 2019, the Democrat accused Trump of describing white nationalists who engaged in violence at Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017 as “very fine people.”

He said just the opposite.

Nonetheless, Biden hammered that lie over and over on the campaign trail.

The Republican National Committee compiled a list of 21 times Biden’s been truth-challenged since moving into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

In November 2021, Biden claimed he used to drive a “tractor-trailer,” but Politifact did some digging and found the president rode in a big rig nearly 50 years ago.

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The fact checker did determine Biden drove a school bus one summer in the 1960s, but buses usually have six wheels — two in the front and four in the back — not 18, like a tractor-trailer.

In November 2022, Biden claimed that he met with the “inventor” of insulin, but multiple scientists are credited with discovering insulin, and two died before the president was even born.

“Dr. Frederick Banting and professor John James Richard Macleod were awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1923 for their 1921 discovery of insulin. Banting died in 1941 and Macleod in 1935. Biden was born in 1942,” the New York Post reported.

“At the same event, Biden incorrectly stated that his late son Beau lost his life while serving in Iraq,” the Post further noted.

In October 2022, Biden said he “had a house burn down with my wife in it” and said they “almost lost a couple firefighters.”

But the truth is in 2004, there was a “small fire” in Biden’s house caused by a lightning strike that was contained to the kitchen, and “there were no injuries.”

Also in October 2022, Biden claimed during a visit to Puerto Rico that he was “raised in the Puerto Rican community” in Delaware.

“We have a very, in relative terms, a large Puerto Rican population in Delaware relative to our population,” Biden said.

“According to the 1970 US Census, Delaware had about 2,154 people who were either born in Puerto Rico or descended from Puerto Rican parents — roughly 0.39% of the First State’s population of nearly 550,000 at the time,” the Post noted.

In September 2021, Biden recounted visiting the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh following the Oct. 2018 shooting that left 11 dead.

“Barb Feige, executive director of the Tree of Life, said that Biden did not visit the synagogue in the nearly three years since the anti-Semitic attack,” the Post reported, nor did he visit prior to it.

In December 2021, Biden said that he served as a “liaison” to Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir during the Six-Day War in 1967. Biden was in law school at the time, and Meir didn’t become PM until 1969.

He was apparently referring to the Yom Kippur War, which took place in 1973, but Fox News reported it is unclear what he meant about being a liaison during the war, because the record shows a then-Sen. Biden met with Meir nearly six weeks before hostilities broke out.

In September 2021, Biden said his first job offer was from the Boise Cascade lumber yard in Idaho.

However, Boise Cascade spokeswoman Lisa Tschampl told the Post, “We have no record of President Biden’s application or of him having worked for the company.”

In January 2022, Biden said the “first time I got arrested” was at a civil rights protest. Washington Post fact-checker Glenn Kessler pointed out that Biden has made similar claims in the past.

Kessler gave Biden’s remarks — which the journalist’s research could not substantiate, even after reaching out to the White House — four Pinocchios, the Post’s worst rating.

In June 2021, Biden repeated a claim he’s made multiple times of having a conversation with an Amtrak conductor Angelo Negri about traveling over one million miles on Air Force 2 as vice president.

“Biden’s account simply does not add up. Biden did not reach the million-miles-flown mark as vice president until September 2015, according to his own past comments. But Negri retired from Amtrak in 1993 and died in May 2014,” CNN reported.

In June 2022, while speaking at the Naval Academy’s graduation, Biden said he was appointed to the school in 1965.

The New York Post reported that there is no record of Biden being nominated to the academy, and he graduated from the University of Delaware in 1965.

Further, no record could be located of Biden being appointed to the school between 1960 and ’65.

In July 2022, Biden said he had cancer due to emissions from oil refineries.

The only cancer the White House said Biden had is skin cancer, which is caused by the sun, not fossil-fuel emissions.

In February 2020, while campaigning for president, Biden said that he “became a professor” after leaving office in 2017.

Biden was in fact named the “Benjamin Franklin Presidential Practice Professor” with the University of Pennsylvania in 2017, “but neither the school nor Biden expected him to teach any classes, according to comments at the time,” the Daily Caller reported.

Further, he never taught a class. His work was based in Washington, D.C., at the Penn Biden Center, where those classified documents recently showed up.

In May 2021, Biden said that his “great-grandpop” was a coal miner. There is at least some truth in this claim.

“Biden’s great-grandfather, Edward Blewitt, went to college and became a civil and mining engineer, and eventually a state senator,” The Washington Post reported.

Biden probably called him a coal miner, rather than an engineer, because it made him sound more working class.

In December, Biden claimed after he was elected vice president in 2008, he awarded his uncle Frank Biden, the Purple Heart for his service during the Battle of the Bulge in World War II.

The president said he did so at the request of his father, Joe Biden Sr. Biden even recalled how he and Joe Sr. went over to Frank’s house to deliver the award to him, but his uncle refused it, saying those who died deserved it.

But the New York Post pointed out that Frank Biden died in 1999 and Joe Sr. in 2002, making the account impossible to be true. Further, there is no military record of Frank ever having been awarded the Purple Heart, which would be required for Biden to have one to try to give him.

In July 2021 while hosting the World Series champion Los Angeles Dodgers, Biden told the players that, in his second congressional baseball game in 1974, he hit a baseball 368 feet off the center field wall.

However, he actually went 0-2 at bat during that game, according to a newspaper account from the time.

In October, while stumping for now-Sen. John Fetterman in Pittsburgh, Biden said his grandfather, Ambrose Finnegan, was an all-American football player at Santa Clara University in California.

Finnegan did attend the school, according to Newsweek, but there is no record of him being an All-American football player. The news outlet noted he may have been a second or third-team All-American, for which records were not kept at that time.

Or he may have received some other special local recognition that people (or just the Biden family) equated with being an All-American.

Last year, Biden took his football tales a step further and said in January 2022 that he “could have been an All-American” football player.

He seemed to be joking, saying if Fetterman had been blocking for him, he could have been an “All-American.”

But it’s doubtful. The president played just one semester on the freshman football team for the University of Delaware. He did not letter because he left the team before the season was over due to low grades, NBC News reported.

So it would have taken a lot more than Fetterman as a teammate for Biden to become an All-American.

In December 2021, while promoting an infrastructure bill, Biden said he thought he could have made it to pro football. He even asked a friend of his who played in the NFL if he could help him get a walk-on tryout.

Maybe this is more delusional than a lie, but again, Biden barely played college football.


In February 2021, Biden told State Department employees that he got “shot at” while he was overseas.

The New York Post reported that the president made a similar claim during a CNN Democratic presidential debate in 2007, recalling it occurred in Baghdad’s Green Zone in Iraq.

Biden later revised his claim saying, “I was near where a shot landed.”

In February 2022, Biden told attendees of the National Association of Counties conference that when he was county council member, he received a call from a woman demanding he remove a dead dog from her lawn, Fox News reported.

He said instead of doing that, he put it on her doorstep.

However, Biden had reportedly previously told the story, saying he drove to her home and removed the animal.

In October 2021, Biden said he was “involved in the civil rights movement.”

When this issue came up when he was running for president in 1987, he was forced to backtrack, The Intercept reported.

At a news conference in September of that year, Biden said, “I was not an activist.”

“I was involved, but I was not out marching. I was not down in Selma, I was not anywhere else,” he added.

Rather Biden said he was aware and concerned about civil rights.

If those 21 tall tales are not enough, Washington Post fact checker Glenn Kessler and his team put together a list in 2021 of the “false and misleading claims” Biden made just in his first 100 days in office.

They include his claim that former President Donald Trump had not ordered enough COVID-19 vaccines and had no plan to distribute them.

Biden also falsely asserted that the vast number of illegal immigrants in the U.S. are those who have overstayed their visas.

The president also said there was a broad consensus of economists that his tax and spending plans would be good for the economy, but the Post pointed out some prominent economists warned the proposals would be inflationary.

Biden has such a penchant for telling falsehoods, coming up with over 21 of them was not too hard.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.