KFC Apologizes After Holocaust-Themed Fried Chicken Ad Goes Live in Germany

The KFC fast food chain is under fire and apologizing for releasing a social media advertisement that offended many Jews and others who recall the dark days of the Nazi era.

KFC released the promotion to customers in Germany on Wednesday via its app that attempted to influence consumers to take advantage of a special offer in connection to Kristallnacht.

The German day of remembrance is supposed to be a somber one.

It recalls Nov. 9, 1938, when the Nazis under Adolf Hitler attacked and looted Jewish businesses and homes, as Insider reported.

The event is known as “the night of broken glass” because of all the windows in homes and businesses that were shattered during that night of destruction.

As NBC News noted in its coverage of the KFC incident, “Kristallnacht” is widely considered to mark the beginning of the Holocaust.

The terrible night of devastation left nearly 100 people dead.

In addition, 1,400 synagogues were destroyed and 30,000 Jews were rounded up for incarceration in concentration camps.

According to BBC Europe, an app alert sent out by KFC Germany read: “It’s memorial day for Kristallnacht! Treat yourself with more tender cheese on your crispy chicken. Now at KFCheese!”

Jewish activists were appalled.

Daniel Sugarman, director of public affairs at the Board of Deputies of British Jews, a Jewish fraternal group in the U.K., called the message “absolutely hideous.”

At the Anti-Defamation League, associate director of European affairs Dalia Grinfeld condemned the message.

About an hour after the message went out to those with the KFC app, it was followed up with an apology, according to the U.K. Daily Mail.

“Due to an error in our system, we sent an incorrect and inappropriate message through our app. We are very sorry about this, we will check our internal processes immediately so that this does not happen again. Please excuse this error,” KFC Germany wrote.

KFC Germany blamed the release of the message on technology, according to BBC Europe, saying it was released via an “automated push notification” that is, “linked to calendars that include national observances.”

The chain said the message was “unplanned.”

It on to indicate that communications for the app were suspended while an investigation surrounding the issue takes place.

According to BBC Europe, the company also noted that, “We understand and respect the gravity and history of this day, and remain committed to equity, inclusion and belonging for all.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.