Hours After Brutal Primary Loss, Liz Cheney Announces New Group and Teases 2024 Plan

After her congressional Republican primary loss, Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney began discussing her new leadership political action committee dedicated to keeping former President Donald Trump from ever holding office again.

With 99 percent of the Wyoming primary votes in on Wednesday, Cheney was soundly beaten in the primary as she trailed about 37 percentage points behind Harriet Hageman, a Trump-backed candidate, NBC News reported.

On Wednesday morning, Politico reported that Hageman had 66.3 percent of votes while Cheney only had 28.9 percent.

But in the face of this loss, Cheney reiterated to Savannah Guthrie on NBC’s “TODAY” show that she will do “whatever it takes” to keep Trump out of the Oval Office in the future.

“I believe that Donald Trump continues to pose a very grave threat and risk to our republic. And I think that defeating him is going to require a broad and united front of Republicans, Democrats and independents, and that’s what I intend to be a part of,” Cheney said on the “TODAY” show.

Cheney has formed a new leadership political action committee named “The Great Task,” one of her aides told NBC.

The Wyoming representative has already filed with the Federal Election Commission in order to transfer the remaining money from her federal campaign funding to the newly formed PAC.

For her campaign, Cheney raised about $14 million, but Politico reported that she did not spend much of it.

According to FEC filings, Cheney still had more than $7 million cash in her campaign funds, NBC reported.

Guthrie also asked Cheney if she was considering running for president herself.

The Wyoming representative did not directly answer but said that the Republican Party has to move away from Trump and the “cult of personality.”

“We’ve to get this party back to a place where we’re embracing the values and the principles on which it was founded,” she said.

When Guthrie asked about a possible presidential run again, Cheney replied that it’s something she will have to think about in the future, but she did not make any announcements on the show.

Politico’s national political correspondent David Siders wrote that Cheney might not be able to win the presidency, but a possible candidacy could drag down Trump a bit.

“In a presidential election decided at the margins, that might be enough in some swing states to keep Trump out of the White House. Not enough for Cheney to win, but enough to drag him down,” Siders noted.

In the meantime, Cheney said that her remaining time in office will be spent working with the Jan. 6 House Committee and fighting for party change.

Cheney’s loss in the Wyoming GOP primary marks the fourth Republican renomination loss out of the 10 Republicans who voted in favor of Trump’s impeachment, Axios reported.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.