Health Expert Shares 10 'Big Levers' to Reduce Risk of Dying

Is there anyone who truly wants to live forever? What if your biological age could be frozen at some desirable place, such as 25?

As it turns out, even if a person’s age could be frozen and, presumably, that spot would include an excellent quality of life, a study revealed that most Americans don’t want to live forever, according to the U.K. Daily Mail.

According to the outlet, when surveyed only 33 percent of Americans would take an immortality pill.

It seems to depend on the age of the person being asked the question as to what age they would want to be frozen at: For young adults, aged 18-29, the age was 23; however, the oldest group polled, with an average age of 88, chose to be frozen at 42.

Regardless of what age one would want to be frozen at, if one wants to live forever, or even just longer, the quality of life definitely makes all the difference.

There have been many studies done over the years as to the most common cause of death.

As of 2016 and 2017, the CDC reported that heart disease is the most common cause for both men and women in the United States.

While some people may need doctors to prescribe some sort of medication to manage heart disease, there are also choices that people can make to help reduce the amount of medication needed. In some cases, the issue may be able to be controlled by diet alone.

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The key thing to remember is that heart disease is a circulatory system illness, and according to Medical News Today, there are many diseases that can impact the circulatory system. A few of these include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, hardening of the arteries, heart attack, heart valve issues and abnormal heart rates and rhythms — to name a few.

Health and Fitness minimalist Jerry Teixira had a few thoughts he refers to as, “levers to pull” regarding choices people can make to enhance their quality of life and extend their life expectancy at the same time.

He decided to put them all into a Twitter thread, which started with the following:

Teixira’s detailed thread included 10 levers to “reduce your risk of dying so you can live a long, full love and do more of whatever it is you love to do”:

  1. Maintain a small waist
  2. Avoid ultra processed foods
  3. Don’t be sedentary
  4. Walk
  5. Exercise
  6. Resistance train (RT)
  7. Improve your cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF)
  8. Manage/reduce stress
  9. Sleep
  10. Make strong social ties

Some of these are things that people have heard before, and number eight is something many people have been talking about a lot over the past several years.

“Lever #8 manage/reduce stress,” Teixira wrote. “A high perceived stress lifestyle increases risk of death from all causes by 32%. Stress kills. Use previous levers to manage stress, or try mediation, reading, less social media. Whatever it takes to feel less stressed.”

The above tips certainly aren’t an exhaustive list of choices people can make in connection to lifestyle changes leading to a longer life with an excellent quality.

However, they may be worth taking into further consideration for adopting into a person’s lifestyle.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.