Detailed Property List from Mar-a-Lago Raid Revealed – FBI Seized Almost 100 Empty Folders

The Justice Department has filed a more detailed list of what was taken in the FBI’s raid at former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home and many of the folders turned out to be empty.

The list of materials was released on Friday after an order from Florida federal Judge Aileen M. Cannon, Fox News reported.

This marks one more step in the process as Cannon decides whether to appoint a “special master” to review the documents for potential executive privilege, as Trump requested.

According to the list provided by the DOJ, there were dozens of classified documents and folders that had classified markings.

But there were also folders that were empty.

All the empty folders were either labeled “classified” or with a “Return to Staff Secretary/Military Aide” label, according to the list.

However, the inventory list provides no explanation as to why the folders were empty.

Along with the dozens of empty folders, there were also several documents labeled “Article of Clothing/Gift Item” and hundreds filed under magazine, newspaper, press and media articles.

Besides those, there were over 1,000 documents that did not have classified markings, even if they were government related.

Trump has previously publicly claimed that the FBI took documents from his home that were unrelated to the investigations, Fox News reported.

While the inventory list released Friday does raise questions about the empty folders and the documents that were filed under “clothing” and “press” related matters, the new filing also showed that there was a significant amount of government-related material at Mar-a-Lago.

In addition to the more detailed inventory list being released, another document related to the investigation was also unsealed to update the court about the status of the investigative team’s review of the documents that were seized in the raid, CNBC News reported.

Titled “Notice of Investigative Team of Status of Review” it was signed by Miami U.S. Attorney Juan Gonzalez, and Jay Bratt, the chief of the counterintelligence and export control section of the national security division of the Justice Department.

The document noted that the investigators had “completed a preliminary review of the materials seized,” the New York Post reported.

“The seized materials will continue to be used to further the government’s investigation, and the investigative team will continue to use and evaluate the seized materials as it takes further investigative steps, such as through additional interviews and grand jury practice,” the review notice read, according to CNBC.

“It is important to note, ‘review’ of the seized materials is not a single investigative step but an ongoing process in this active criminal investigation,” the document added.

But this filing that updated the status of the investigation and review of the documents did not give further information or explanation related to the released inventory list.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.