BREAKING: Eric Bolling Makes Epic Move to Clear His Name

Eric Bolling was suspended from his show on Fox News because of accusations that he sent lewd picture messages to three women that he worked with at the network. Bolling fiercely denied the allegations and is working on clearing his name.

According to The New York Times, Bolling is suing the author of the piece, Yashar Ali of Huffington Post, for $50 million. The lawsuit is for defamation and it not directed at HuffPo, but rather Ali as an individual. The defamation suit was filed Wednesday in the New York State Supreme Court. The hope here is that Bolling can clear his name and go on with his life unscathed.

There is no doubt that Ali’s initial article damaged Bolling’s reputation as a cable news host and as an individual. The suspension came Saturday when news broke through HuffPo of Bolling’s alleged misconduct.

According to the piece published by Ali, Bolling “sent an unsolicited photo of male genitalia via text message to at least two colleagues at Fox Business and one colleague at Fox News.” In typical Huffington Post fashion, all of their sources claimed they wanted to remain anonymous.

Interestingly, if the claim had any merit, Bolling would already know the names of his accusers. Additionally, if those making the accusations agreed with Ali’s article, they would likely allow their name to be published. That is, if these claims were true.

The official court document points out Ali’s “efforts to injure the plaintiff’s reputation through the intentional and/or highly reckless publication of actionable false and misleading statements about the plaintiff’s conduct and character.”

Bolling is currently represented by Michael J. Bowe from the law firm Kasowitz Benson Torres. The law firm has quite an impressive lineup. Marc E. Kasowitz is a personal lawyer for President Trump and worked with Bill O’Reilly when he was facing sexual harassment accusations back in April.

Ali is holding to his word, despite Bolling’s lawsuit having a $50 million price tag that would redeem his reputation should it be awarded. Ali took to Twitter to try and defend his name and his honor.

He claimed that he stood by what he initially reported and that his sources would remain protected. In one Tweet, he even said, “Not going to stop reporting on Eric Bolling or anyone else. I’ve had family members killed/jailed in Iran, a lawsuit isn’t going to scare me”

If Ali is telling the truth, that will come out in the end. But if he is using deceased family members as an excuse to cover his shady reporting, that can only be viewed as despicable.

The truth remains that Ali has a history of writing for organizations that go out of their way to target Fox News and their hosts. In the past, he has worked for organizations like New York Magazine and Mother Jones, both of which have had problems reporting the truth.

At the time, Lydia Polgreen, the editor in chief of Huffington Post, said that their company will stand by Ali’s story. Are they standing by the story because they believe it to be true, or because their name isn’t on the court summons?