‘Avatar’ Director Claims Showing Pregnant Women as Warriors and Hunters Is ‘Female Empowerment’

Shameless pandering, thy name is James Cameron.

The lauded filmmaker and director, who is the visionary behind some genuine blockbuster hits like “Terminator 2: Judgment Day,” “Aliens,” “Titanic,” and, of course, “Avatar,” has been making the rounds lately, promoting his much-ballyhooed sequel “Avatar: The Way of Water.”

That, in and of itself, is hardly noteworthy. If anything, it’s almost expected.

What’s not quite as expected is some of the bizarre rhetoric that Cameron is pushing.

Case in point, Cameron gave an interview with Variety recently where he discussed “female empowerment,” but went about it in the most asinine of ways.

“I was really taken by the fact that Neytiri hunts while she’s pregnant. And then you have one of the characters go into battle pregnant. Why was that important?” director Robert Rodriguez asked Cameron, as a part of Variety’s “Directors on Directors” series. Neytiri is one of the main characters in Cameron’s shameless aping of “Pocahontas.”

“Everybody’s always talking about female empowerment,” Cameron answered. “But what is such a big part of a woman’s life that we, as men, don’t experience? And I thought, ‘Well, if you’re really going to go all the way down the rabbit hole of female empowerment, let’s have a female warrior who’s six months pregnant in battle.’”

Where to even begin with that sentiment?

First of all, Cameron quite hastily contradicted himself by merely mentioning what men can’t do that women can. Childbirth is chief among those, and there’s a reason it’s a profoundly feminine thing.

But apparently, that’s not enough for Cameron?

No, he felt compelled to make pregnancy a mere characteristic of a fighter, which is just wildly misguided on so many levels.

“It doesn’t happen in our society — probably hasn’t happened for hundreds of years. But I guarantee you, back in the day, women had to fight for survival and protect their children, and it didn’t matter if they were pregnant,” Cameron said. “And pregnant women are more capable of being a lot more athletic than we, as a culture, acknowledge. I thought, ‘Let’s take the real boundaries off.’ To me, it was the last bastion that you don’t see. Wonder Woman and Captain Marvel — all these other amazing women come up, but they’re not moms and they’re not pregnant while they’re fighting evil.”

“Let’s take the real boundaries off”? That’s a tell if there ever was one.

Cameron’s nonsensical rhetoric appears to be just the latest in a continued push from the far left to homogenize men and women.

It’s ultimately destructive to the feminist cause Cameron is trying to laud, and yet it’s become something of a battle cry for the left.

Instead of focusing and elevating characteristics that are distinctly male or female, Cameron, and the left, are fixated on eliminating those distinctions.

Just look at pregnancy itself. In recent years, the left has insisted that men can get pregnant, birthing (pun very much intended) the nonsensical “pregnant people” term.

Cameron appears to be furthering that agenda by, once again, lessening the value of pregnancy by treating it like some impediment that a warriors must overcome.

I was blessed enough to be there when my pregnant wife gave birth to my son.

It was incredibly impressive and tough, and no three-hour movie or overhyped CGI was necessary.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.