Arrest Made in 2017 Killing of Indiana Girls, One Hailed as Hero for What She Remembered to Do

New reports indicate that Indiana police may be ready to wrap up a double murder from 2017 in which two teen-aged girls were killed.

A man has been arrested in connection with the crime, according to WXIN-TV. The station citing sources it did not identify, said the man’s name was Richard Allen

The station said the 50-year-old man was first held in the Carroll County Jail and later transferred to a state facility.

WTHR-TV also reported that it was told by sources it did not name that Allen has been arrested in connection with the case.

The Louisville Journal & Courier reported that a news conference is scheduled for Monday in the case, but that officials are tight-lipped about what will be announced.

Kelsi German, the older sister of one victim, indicated a major event was coming.

“Just know how grateful I am for all of you. No comments for now, any questions please refer to the Carroll county prosecutors office. There is tentatively a press conference Monday at 10am. We will say more then. Today is the day,” she tweeted.

Libby German, 14, and Abby Williams, 13, were killed in February 2017. They had been dropped off on a hiking trail but were never seen alive again.

Libby German had taken a photo of a man coming across a bridge, as well as other images, and recorded a man saying “down the hill.”

Police have been trying to find the girls’ killer using that evidence, and have followed a number of leads over the years.

In February, Indiana State Police Superintendent Doug Carter told WTHR he had hopes of a resolution to the case.

“Eventually, I’ll be able to tell the world what we know, and the rest of the group will be able to tell the world what we know. Unfortunately, I can’t right now,” Carter said.

He added to that earlier this week, telling WRTV-TV, “Three years, two years 11 months,” Carter said. “It could be today. We continue to move in a positive direction.”

Kelsi German told WTHR earlier this year she was also trying to be patient and trying to believe that justice would be done.

“When I’m feeling frustrated, when I feel like no answers are coming and I’m feeling dejected, I say that. I say, ‘Today is the day. It’s coming and it’ll get here. We’re going to have answers’ and just reaffirm myself and say, ‘It’s hard, it’s frustrating, it’s been five years, but we’re going to have answers eventually. It’s coming,” she said.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.